Category Archives: Children and Youth

After 10 Years, Fine Tuning is Needed for the Mental Health Services Act

After about ten years of implementation some fine tuning is needed for the Mental Health Services Act to better achieve its goals

This Thursday May 26th the Little Hoover Commission will hold its Prop-63-Logosecond hearing on the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA). At issue is its conclusion that state officials have not implemented the recommendations they made in January 2015.

At the same time legislators are taking unprecedented steps to earmark funds (Senate No Place Like Home budget proposal; AB 2017 McCarty – College Students; AB 2279 – Fiscal Reporting). CCCBHA and I support these efforts and join other stakeholders in recognizing the need for some fine tuning of this act.

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Hot Legislative Topics in January 2016: Housing and School Mental Health

(January 25, 2016)

A Lot More in Housing than Just the Prop 63 $2 Billion Bond Proposal

Housing has centered on the $2 Billion Proposition 63 Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) proposal by Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon and Darrell Steinberg that was presented together with a proposal to have local pilot programs to house other homeless people through new state funds as well as an increase in the SSI/SSP benefit for people who are disabled.

Besides that proposal, the governor’s budget reinforced the need to increase the SSI/SSP benefit and proposed funding to cities, counties and providers to provide housing and services for people coming out of state prison.

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Early Psychosis Programs – taking it to scale

Early psychosis programs began about 20 years ago in Melbourne Australia led by a psychiatrist who observed data showing that there was an incredibly greater recovery rate among those people with schizophrenia who were first seen within a few months after the onset of psychosis.

Their program demonstrated that for that population they were able to achieve a success rate of 80% being discharged from the intensive treatment program to medication only after 18 months and full time employment or education as compared to a success rate of only about 20% for people for whom treatment is delayed for more than a year after the initial experience of psychosis.

This success has generally been replicated in other programs. Until recently, nearly all such programs were small “pilot” programs including about a dozen funded by the MHSA in California.

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